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As a recent Flatiron Grad, applying to jobs, networking, and practicing Data Structures & Algorithms are what we do most!

Here are some of my favorite resources:

Leetcode https://leetcode.com/discuss/general-discussion/494279/comprehensive-data-structure-and-algorithm-study-guide

HackerRank (my favorite at the moment) https://www.hackerrank.com/domains/data-structures

hackerrank.com/domains/algorithms

CodeChef https://www.codechef.com/certification/data-structures-and-algorithms/prepare

Geeks for Geeks https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/data-structures/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/fundamentals-of-algorithms/

Here is one of the many MANY good Udemy courses: https://www.udemy.com/course/data-structures-and-algorithms-the-complete-guide/ it is regularly $94.99 BUT wait for it, they have sales often!! and you can get it for $10 or sometimes even less on a bundled sale.

And finally, one of the best groups to join for meetups/practice sessions https://www.meetup.com/nyc-coders/events/276218283 NYC Coders hosts a slack channel and a lot of meetups for varying levels, so that is a great group to follow on meetups, and join their meetings and slack server.


Author yupiramos

Congratulations! If you are asking this question, you have gotten quite far along the path, have an acceptance in hand and are staring down your bootcamp start date, with excitement and probably a bit of trepidation!

Fear not… you will be ready!

First, make sure to complete all of the required PreWork assigned to you by the bootcamp. This is the foundation upon which your bootcamp will begin on day one, and if you haven’t done it, you will be chasing from behind the whole time. …


created using Pixlr.com

So, I found myself working on a small team developing a game, which is great, huzzah! But soon we needed testers (other than the few of us on the team). And once we had a few dozen people testing and reporting bugs, it became necessary to have a system in place — but one that doesn’t come with a big sticker price.

First, I designed a Trello board. With a key, for labeling the categories of the bugs from severe to minor. Then set I set up my Trello bug tracker tool to have this list structure:

  1. Key
  2. Incoming
  3. Acknowledged…


c Maxim Ilyahov

Talk about your tech past — even if it’s the very recent past — even if it’s only a “Hello World” script!

Bootcamps just want to know that you have had the motivation to get to know what coding is, find out if you have an aptitude for it, and an interest and a passion to drive you to learn more. If you have past experience, great!! If you don’t, do not fear! Many of us (myself included!), had no prior knowledge of code when we began this journey. …


BB Coffee Shop by Juja Han@juja_han

As a recent bootcamp grad, I am thirsty for more information, as clearly in a few short months I have barely scratched the surface. Also, as a digital nomad, I am frequently on the road for days at a time, and seek to listen to audiobooks and podcasts.

Happily, I have discovered some quality podcasts and audiobooks that have been wonderful opportunities to quench my thirst for more programming knowledge while safely driving!


While working on my React project, I researched several npm calendar libraries, including one of which I implemented. But also, came to discover a way that one can grow one’s own garden of npm libraries and save time for future projects.

Start by creating a new react app:

npx create-react-app component-library

Then delete everything inside src, and create a new index.js

//index.jsimport React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";
ReactDOM.render(<div>Hello world</div>, document.getElementById("root"));

Add a new folder into src, called lib, and then all the components you make can be published to npm from there, for example:

//src/lib/LogCalendar.js'import React…


This weekend, I attended one of the new CS50’s New Year’s Seminars, “A Taste of Python”. I had never worked in Python prior to this, so I was excited to get my first “taste” of a new language (new, for me).

We began, of course, with ‘hello, world!’.

print("hello, world!")

So, friendly! So far, so good. The course was taught by Brian Yu, and there were an unbelievable 1,000 participants on the zoom call, with another estimated 1,000 more following on YouTube, and even more following on FaceBook.

CS50 A Taste of Python 2021–01–16 12:00 from https://cs50.smugmug.com/Mosaics/i-3dpCNqL

Given the large number of participants, it was delightfully surprising to see…


What is this fetch thing? By its name, we might guess that we are asking for and going to receive something… sorta like askin’ Fido to go get that daily newspaper for us. We tell him “fetch!” and he runs off and returns with the paper, which, contains a promise that it holds some news, which we can read if we so choose, once we unpack, unfold, and read it.

So, as it happens, the Fetch API is a JavaScript interface we can use to retrieve, store, update and delete data. …


Failing at anything can be painful. Failing a code challenge in bootcamp is excruciating. Not only do you experience the voice of self-doubt, waves of self-criticism, and, yes, admittedly it feels a bit embarrassing, too! But there’s the added pressure of taking the time off from work and having an income to do this, the temporary loss of any sense of success or expertise you were getting from your old job, and the fear that this investment of time and money (yeah, tuition is steep!), may have been a fool’s errand!

But each time, after the code challenge, we…

Jeanmarie Jackman

Full Stack Developer | Software Engineer | React | Ruby on Rails | Musician | Artist | Educator

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